Commuters and the Rain

Commuters and the Rain

Umuulan sa España. That one line from the song that set the mood for the rain I was experiencing.

Commuters and the Rain is a creative nonfiction piece written by Trisha Marie Quinanola Rebayla and shared with The Ugly Writers under the theme Creating Sparks for the month of December

Commuters and the Rain

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Whenever people look at me, they see yellow 一 a color I have embodied for almost the entirety of my life. It was the energy of sunshine that perhaps radiated through my smile or the way I communicate with people in day to day life.

Being the person that I am, I always love the sunshine but not to the extent that it burns my skin. I am talking about a cool, fair day where I could more or less hear the chatter of students with their chika sessions as I pass by them on campus. The kind of day where I see students out under the not-so-scorching heat of the sun.

Today was different. The calendar read September 30.

As I am writing this narrative, I am sitting by the steps that face an open theater. The sky was gloomy, blanketed in dark nimbus clouds. It drizzled, and then rained.

I cannot help but be reminded of a certain day I used to commute back home from Talamban to Lapu-Lapu. Here was my route: a 13C jeepney ride from USC Talamban Campus to Ayala, then a vhire to Tamiya, and a tricycle to go to Basak. From Basak (particularly in front of Gaisano Grand Mall), if the weather permits, I walk home. If not, I ride habal-habal.

And if you are anywhere from Cebu, you cannot deny the fact that commuting from Point A to Point B in the city is the literal definition of “kapoy”. For my daily commute then, it took me two hours to reach home and that is more or less the same duration of taking a flight from Cebu to Hong Kong.

It was sometime during the second semester of sophomore year. It rained pretty hard in Lapu-Lapu. Mud was not visible because it was covered by the flood that reached your ankles. My shoes and socks got wet in the process of finding a tricycle to ride which, by the way, was also challenging to find considering the rain.

When I finally got on one tricycle, I prayed to the Heavens above to hear my plea, to stop the rain 一 only to see lightning and the thunder that followed after my prayer. “Sige nalang, kalma ka gorl”, I thought. I took out my earphones and clicked on Spotify. I scrolled through my playlist and found the perfect song to play given the circumstances. Hanggang sa Buwan by Kenaniah.

Umuulan sa España. That one line from the song that set the mood for the rain I was experiencing. I guess a person who has watched The Rain in España could associate the song with rain because of a certain scene where the main leads were under a shed while it was raining. A few minutes later, I was able to get home safely and was undeniably soaked by the rain.

Rainy days are certainly challenging for most if not all, especially for commuters. I think I have this tendency to romanticize even the littlest of things. Rain. Walking. And even my daily commute then. Regardless, it is cliché to even say this on text but the struggle is real.

The rain did not stop until the following morning when I saw a rainbow, streaks of colors that arched at the blue sky 一 a reminder that with time, a better day will come to all.

to the earth we return

Read previous entries from the theme Trust The Process here on The Ugly Writers

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Trisha Marie Quiñanola Rebayla

Trisha Marie Quiñanola Rebayla

Trisha Marie Q. Rebayla is inspired by the beauty of what words can offer to the world. She is a BA in Literary and Cultural Studies with Creative Writing student studying at the University of San Carlos. She was the Editor-in-Chief (2020-2021) of Warrior's Ink, the official student publication of the University of San Carlos – North School. As of today, she has been noted as the first Executive Vice-President of Societatis Lingua Artes (SOLARES), the official co-curricular organization of the Department of Communications, Linguistics, and Literature at the University of San Carlos, and is also affiliated with Pulong sa mga Alagad sa Obra (PALABRA), the official literature organization at the University of San Carlos.

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