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Man’s Search for Meaning

Every year we commemorate International Holocaust Remembrance Day. It is estimated that 11 million people were killed during the Holocaust. Six million of these were Jews. The Nazis killed approximately two-thirds of all Jews living in Europe.  An estimated 1.1 million children were murdered in the Holocaust.

Man’s Search for Meaning

 

Every year we commemorate International Holocaust Remembrance Day. It is estimated that 11 million people were killed during the Holocaust. Six million of these were Jews. The Nazis killed approximately two-thirds of all Jews living in Europe.  An estimated 1.1 million children were murdered in the Holocaust.

Viktor Emil Frankl (1905 – 1997) was an Austrian neurologist and psychiatrist as well as a Holocaust survivor. His experiences as a concentration camp inmate led him to discover the importance of finding meaning in all forms of existence, even the most brutal ones, and thus, a reason to continue living.

In my most recent reading of his classic book “Man’s Search for Meaning”, I was struck by his statement “striving to find a meaning in one’s life is the primary motivational force in man.  That is why I speak of a will to meaning in contrast to the pleasure principle (or, as we could also term it, the will to pleasure) on which Freudian psychoanalysis is centered, as well as in contrast to the will to power which Adlerian psychology, using the term “striving for superiority,” is focused.”

I think it is appropriate to substitute the word “purpose” for Frankl’s word “meaning.”  Therefore, of the three motivations that Frankl identifies, pleasure, power, and purpose, the purpose is the primary motivation of humankind.  The purpose is also one of my five identified components of a healthy life.

Here is another excerpt from the book:

“In attempting this psychological presentation and a psychopathological explanation of the typical characteristics of a concentration camp inmate, I may give the impression that the human being is completely and unavoidably influenced by his surroundings.  (In this case, the surroundings being the unique structure of camp life, which forced the prisoner to conform his conduct to a certain set pattern.)  But what about human liberty?  Is there no spiritual freedom in regard to behavior and reaction to any given surroundings?  Is that theory true which would have us believe that man is no more than a product of many conditional and environmental factors – be they of a biological, psychological or sociological nature?  Is man but an accidental product of these?  Most important, do the prisoners’ reactions to the singular world of the concentration camp prove that man cannot escape the influences of his surroundings?  Does man have no choice of action in the face of such circumstances?

We can answer these questions from experience as well as on principle.  The experiences of camp life show that man does have a choice of action.  There were enough examples, often of a heroic nature, which proved that apathy could be overcome, irritability suppressed.  Man can preserve a vestige of spiritual freedom, of independence of mind, even in such terrible conditions of psychic and physical stress.

We who lived in concentration camps can remember the men who walked through the huts comforting others, giving away their last piece of bread.  They may have been few in number, but they offer sufficient proof that everything can be taken from a man but one thing:  the last of the human freedoms – to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s way.

And there were always choices to make.  Every day, every hour, offered the opportunity to make a decision, a decision which determined whether you would or would not submit to those powers which threatened to rob you of your very self, your inner freedom; which determined whether or not you would become the plaything of circumstance, renouncing freedom and dignity to become molded into the form of the typical inmate.

Seen from this point of view, the mental reactions of the inmates of a concentration camp must seem more to us than the mere expression of certain physical and sociological conditions.  Even though conditions such as lack of sleep, insufficient food and various mental stresses may suggest that the inmates were bound to react in certain ways, in the final analysis, it becomes clear that the sort of person the prisoner became was the result of an inner decision and not the result of camp influences alone.  Fundamentally, therefore, any man can, even under such circumstances, decide what shall become of him – mentally and spiritually.  He may retain his human dignity even in a concentration camp.”

 

If you liked Man’s Search for Meaning, please support Michael Natt by reading his previous entries here at The Ugly Writers:

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Michael Natt
Michael is a certified personal trainer through the National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM). He also has NASM certifications in corrective exercise, sports performance and behavior change. He has senior fitness specialty and group fitness certifications through the National Exercise Trainers Association (NETA), and a fitness nutrition certification through the International Sports Science Association (ISSA). Michael earned a master’s degree in human resources development from the University of St. Thomas, and works with people to integrate their fitness goals with their life goals. Michael lives in Eden Prairie Minnesota.
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